The next step up from Dubbel in the monastic beer classification, Tripel is higher in alcohol than Dubbel but is actually lighter in color and body. The addition of clear candi sugar dilutes the malt bill, which helps preserve the golden color and makes the body deceptively light for a beer of this strength. Spicy and fruity with a gentle sweetness and hints of alcohol throughout leading to a dry and mildly bitter finish.
The tripel beer style was a classification introduced around the 1930’s to describe the strongest beer in the monastic communities beer strength range. Tripels are generally beers with an alcohol content ranging from 8% – 10%.

This recipe is probably one of the easiest for a new home-brewer to try since it uses an extract and is not an all grain recipe so advanced equipment is not required in order to produce the similar style the monastic communities have produced for centuries.

Recipe Statistics:

OG: 1.078 (Original Gravity)
FG: 1.013 (Final Gravity)
IBU: 39.1 (International Bittering Units)
SRM: 6.10 (Beer Color)
ABV: 8.52 (Alcohol By Volume)

Ingredients:

  • 9 pounds Briess Golden Light Liquid Extract
  • 1 pound Clear Candi Sugar
  • 1 pound Briess 2 Row Carapils, crushed
  • 2 ounces Hallertau, NZ Pellets – 60 minutes
  • 1 White Labs Belgian Strong Ale Yeast

Instructions:

  • Tie the Briess 2 Row Carapils, crushed, in a large mesh grain bag or hop bag.
  • Bring 3 Gallons of water between 150°F – 160°F.
  • Place the bag in 3 gallons of water in a 5 gallon pot and immerse the grain.
  • Steep for 20 minutes making sure the mesh bag is not sitting on the bottom of the pot.
  • After 20 minutes remove the mesh bag.
  • Bring wort to a vigorous boil. As water is heating, slowly add 2 pounds of Briess Golden Light Liquid Extract, stirring constantly until completely dissolved.
  • When the boil begins, add 2 ounces Hallertau, NZ Pellets hops in a mesh bag.
  • After 45 minutes of boiling, add remaining 7 pounds of Briess Golden Light Liquid Extract and 1 pound of Belgian candy sugar, stirring constantly until completely dissolved.
  • After total of 60 minutes of boil, remove from heat.
  • Cool wort by placing pot in ice bath until it is below 85°F.
  • Transfer to sanitized fermentor (either a carboy or a fermentation bucket).
  • Top off to make 5 gallons using water.
  • Take a gravity reading with your hydrometer. Make a note of this number, since you will be using it to calculate the actual alcohol content when it’s done fermenting. The reading should be around 1.078.
  • Carefully pour yeast into cooled wort (it should be below 70°F), and agitate vigorously.
  • Cover fermentor with a sanitized stopper and airlock. Ferment in dark place, keeping ambient temperature consistent, preferably between 68 and 70°F.
  • After primary fermentation is complete (take at least two consistent gravity readings), transfer to a secondary carboy for conditioning store as cool as possible.
  • Bottle after another four to six weeks using enough priming sugar for a high level of carbonation.

Instructions for Priming Sugar:

Use 2/3 cup sugar in 16 oz water. Bring the solution to a boil and pour into the bottling bucket.

Cheers!

 

 

Main Menu

Last 5 Posts
Posted: May 27, 2013
Posted In: Currently Vinting
Posted: Mar 31, 2013
Posted In: Beer Recipes,We Vinted
Posted: Mar 24, 2013
Posted In: Tips and Tricks
Posted: Mar 17, 2013
Posted In: Beer Recipes
Posted: Feb 17, 2013
Posted In: Beer Recipes,We Vinted

Hot Deals
Posted: Jan 28, 2013
Posted In: Hot Deals
Posted: Jan 17, 2013
Posted In: Hot Deals

Currently Vinting or Brewing
Posted: May 27, 2013
Posted In: Currently Vinting
Posted: Feb 14, 2013
Posted In: Currently Vinting

Post Categories

Archives

Valid CSS! Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional